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  Guitar Minor Pentatonic Scale inside Dorian Scale Mode – Right & Left Handed

Guitar Minor Pentatonic Scale inside the Dorian Scale Mode. E Dorian Mode is the 2th (ii) degree of D Ionian (Major) Scale. The Dorian Mode has a Minor 3rd Interval making it a minor sounding mode. The only difference in sound between the Ionian (Major) and the Dorian Mode. The is the Major 3 and Major 7 is moved down a half step to the b3 (Minor 3rd interval) and b7 (Minor 7th Interval).

If you are doing ear training the Dorian Scale Mode can sometimes be mistaken for the Aeolian Minor Mode. Proper ear training helps to hear the subtle difference moving down those half step notes.

Another big confusion with modes in the beginning. The G Ionian (Major) and D Dorian are the same key. Parallel modes played off of the same tonal center, E Ionian (Major) and G Dorian are two different keys.

E Minor Pentatonic Scale (1, b3, 4, 5, b7) inside the Dorian Scale Mode (1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, b7) is missing the 2nd and the 6th Interval to make it Pentatonic. This is one of the more common pentatonic scales used in rock and blues. The E open position gives the scale a lot of unique possibilities to explore hammer and pull off open licks. This position sits right on top of the E (I IV V) (E-A-B) open blues chord progression. Phrasing riffs between rhythm and lead is very common.

E Dorian / Minor Pentatonic w Intervals     Minor Pentatonic Scale inside the Dorian Scale Mode The E Dorian Mode is the 2th (ii) degree of D Ionian (Major) Scale. The Dorian Mode has a Minor 3rd Interval making it a minor sounding mode. The only difference in sound between the Ionian (Major) and the Dorian Mode. The is the Major 3 and Major 7 is moved down a half step to the b3 (Minor 3rd interval) and b7 (Minor 7th Interval). If you are doing ear training the Dorian Mode can sometimes be mistaken for the Aeolian Minor. Proper ear training helps to hear the subtle difference moving down those half step notes. Another big confusion with modes in the beginning. The G Ionian (Major) and D Dorian are the same key. Parallel modes played off of the same tonal center, E Ionian (Major) and G Dorian are now two different keys. E Min Pentatonic Scale (1, b3, 4, 5, b7) inside the Dorian Scale Mode (1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, b7) is missing the 2nd and the 6th Interval to make it Pentatonic. This is one of the more common pentatonic scale used in rock and blues. The E open position gives the scale a lot of unique possibilities to explore hammer and pull off open licks. This position sites right on top of the E (I IV V) (E A B) open chord progression. Phrasing riffs between rhythm and lead is very common.          E Dorian / Minor Pentatoinic w/Intervals Left Handed     E Dorian / Minor Pentatonic w/ Fingers Left Hand

All the above guitar scale diagrams were created with Guitar Analyzer Publisher Edition Software

Guitar Octaves and Unison Notes Color Separated

A good way to see how octave and unison notes are organized on guitar is to use colors to separate the octave notes. The Chromatic Scale in the key root of E is a good balanced layout to see the octave separation.

On a right handed guitar, octave notes have a stair step effect from left to right and unison notes from right to left. When there is so many unison notes of the same pitch on the guitar. How does a guitar player know which ones to use?

The best choice in starting is to pick a fingering that covers at least two full octaves closest to the lowest root note of the chord being played. The highest notes in the solo usually journey back the starting octave. No rules can be set in stone, but the closest distance back to the chord is usually the best desired return point.

Completing a solo then falling back into the rhythm timing of a chord can be a difficult transition. The closer the mechanical distance back usually makes it an easier task. Practice with a clear mind map of the guitar fret board architecture results with better instincts to navigate around.

E Chromatic Octave Colored

The above guitar scale diagram was created with Guitar Analyzer Publisher Edition Software

 

The E Blues Chromatic Scale Guitar Open String Position

The E Blues Chromatic Scale open string position is a hybrid scale made up of three scales. E Minor Pentatonic, E Blues and E Major 3rd Pentatonic Hybrid Scale. It is Minor Pentatonic Scale with the Major 3rd and Diminished 5th notes added to it. The five chromatic notes with the four half steps make a unique combination of passing tones. A lot of famous country guitar players  utilities this scale.

When playing the E Blues Chromatic Scale the Minor Pentatonic and Blues Scale will be the familiar scales to most guitar players. The Major 3rd is the dissonant note that makes it feel off, especially if it’s resolving to a Minor Chord. Outside chromatic notes work best to the V Chord or in turnarounds in Blues.

Having five chromatic notes also makes an awkward feel when phrasing. The common way to play through them is to not play them in a straight sequence but to traverse with whole steps and whole half steps and then pull off or hammer to the extra half step.

Phrasing passing tone notes in straight chromatic sequence can be done tastefully gliding across the notes fast. The real unique thing with this open fingering position is you have all four fingers lined up to a straight four finger per fret alignment. Having them all backed to a open note position making it easy to play fast alternate open note hammer on and pull offs. This opens up the exploration to many unique guitar open note lick possibilities.

E Blue Chromatic Scale            E Blues Chromatic / Min. Pentatonic            E Blues Chromatic / Blues            E Blues Chromatic / Maj3 Pentatonic

All the above guitar scale diagrams were created with Guitar Analyzer Publisher Edition Software

    Learn new guitar scale unison note patterns

Maps to learn guitar scale unison notes on the guitar fret board. There is an Ancient Chinese Proverb: The shortest way to a travel destination is the way you know.  This can be the beginning to creating a bad habit patterns. To break these patterns we must to start exploring new paths to the same destination. Better guitar practice is mapping new ways to get around the guitar fret board. Lets start exploring different paths by try different fingering patterns of guitar scale unison notes.

There are 3 (2 Octave Guitar Fingering paths) that share the same unison notes. This is good practice to break some bad habits of getting around the Fret Board. Most guitar players use the scale fingering starting with the 1st – Index Finger.

You can achieve the same result with less hand re-positioning and mechanical movement. The result is better fret hand dexterity to develop speed and melodic control. Through repetitive practice your fingers will develop the ability to follow the inner guidance of the minds ear. As to the metaphor in transcendental meditation of the third eye can also relate to the musical ear.

I picked a commonly used scale in the key of D Major that displays the Lydian IV Degree. This is the tonal center G Lydian Scale Mode with the Major Pentatonic Secondary Guitar Scale inside it.  The first guitar scale fingering diagram has a open fret fingering position for the challenge.

Guitar Analyzer Software can create color guitar scale unison note fingering diagrams images like the ones below. A new feature for the publishing guitarists and guitar teachers (software version 1.0.7.15). Please try out and practice these 2 0ctave guitar fingerings for the G Lydian / Major Pentatonic Scale.

                                                                                       G Lydian / Maj Pent 3 Diagram

G Lydian / Major Pentatonic

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Create Custom Guitar Diagrams

Guitar Analyzer Software takes guitar scale mastery to higher analytical levels. Scale modes can be learned understood and analyzed in dimensions like never before. Analyze scale mode harmony charts to each degree of a scale with a couple of clicks of a mouse. The scale formula analysis lets you see the formula to notes and step spacing between note intervals. The scale fingering selection takes scale analysis to the next level that makes it unmatched by any other software. Custom note color with octave separation and four guitar fret board colors. If your a left hand guitar player every diagram can be instantly flipped. Create professional looking guitar fingering diagrams for guitar teaching and publishing.

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                                            G Mixolydian Mode

The G Mixolydian Mode is the 5th degree of C Ionian (Major) Scale. The Mixolydian Mode has a Major 3rd Interval making it a major sounding mode. The only difference in sound between the Ionian (Major) and the Mixolydian Mode. The last note in the Major Scale the 7th (Major 7th interval) is moved down a half step to a b7 (Minor 7th Interval).

If you are doing ear training the Mixolydian Mode can easily be mistaken for the Ionian Major. Proper training helps to hear the subtle difference moving that last note down a half step. The first six notes played are same interval notes between the two scales.

Another big confusion with modes in the beginning. C Ionian (Major) and G Mixolydian are of the same key. Parallel modes are two different scales with the same tonal center, G Ionian (Major) and G Mixolydian are now two different keys. Key Signature G Major 1 sharp and D Major 2 sharps with the 1 raised 1/2 step note.

The scale diagrams below display 2 Octave fingering played starting at the 3rd Fret. They show the Interval, Note, and Finger Placement of G Mixolydian Mode. This is a quick and easy option to view with Guitar Analyzer Software. Physical practice playing these fingerings straight up ascending and down descending. Helps beginners develop their auditory intelligence along with physical dexterity muscle memory.

The next level of practice is sequences which is a repeating pattern of notes. Here is a triplets style pattern (121, 232, 343, and so on) with each group of 2 notes going up the scale. The next ascending triplet sequence is up 3 notes (123, 234, 345 and so on). Repeat the process going in a backward sequence descending from the highest note.

G Mixoydian Mode Steps

                                                   G Mixolydian Mode Intervals GMixolModeNts150x165 G Mixolydian Mode Finger Placement

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The guitar scales fret-board diagrams below show the C Ionian (Major) Mode on the guitar. The C Ionian Mode is the 1st degree to the 1st degree by octave of the C Major Scale. The Scale formula for the C Ionian (Major) Mode is (1,2,3,4,5,6,7). The key of C Major has no sharp or flat accidentals in the notes of the scale and the 1/2 steps are between E – F and B – C.

The Major 3rd interval which the 3rd note of the C Ionian (Major) Scale gives the scale it’s tonal personality of a happy up beat sound. You will probably hear the Ionian Major Scale in background music in a movies to set a happy mood in a particular movie scene. Below I am giving three guitar scales fret-board fingering diagrams of the C Ionian (Majo)r Scale on the 8th fret in three views (Interval, Notes, Finger Placement).

Try playing the notes on the guitar outlined by the guitar scales fret-board squares showing the octave to octave squares. As you are playing the note listen carefully to the sound of the C Ionian Major Scale. Related Post > Understand Major Scale Modes

C Major Scale Steps

                                            C Major Ionian - Intervals C Ionian Major - Notes C Ionian Major - Fingers

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There’s by no means any rock solid approach to teach songwriting on guitar and how to write a song. The best way is to write out a list of your favorite songs played by other people. Learn each song by analyzing them by ear and listen in to what’s being played. Use your guitar and play along with them to find the scales and chords. Make sure your guitar is in tune and if you still can’t match up anything, it could be that it’s tuned down a half step or more. A lot of guitar player are doing this for certain reasons like vocal ranges or to give the song more bottom end bass. They also do it to have different open string position for different scale keys.

Recognize what parts of the song are the same musically and isolate the parts to figure them out. Figure out what chords are being played. You can usually find the highest or the lowest notes of the chord and carefully listen in to find the notes between. To group the isolated song parts I put some song form grouping concepts below. First the song form variations use the letters ABC as variable like you uses in algebra math.The letters can be anything, all they do is help you group together what parts are the same. In lyric writing of song form, a number can be used with the letters to keep track of the rhyme sets of the lyric words (A1, A2, B1, A1).There are some grouping ideas of some traditional song forms below.

Next there is the song format that has four distinct parts used in modern songwriting on guitar. Each type is explained in a summarized simple way as best I could to help you recognize the parts in your song. The last part shows common variations of modern songs matching the song form groups to the song format. To help you memorize a song, group up the song parts in the format blocks as Verse 1, Chorus 1, Verse 2, Chorus 2 etc.

When you learn your favorite songs written by other people, you’ll start gathering inspiration to writing your own songs. The best songs are written from an emotional inspiration and can have a unique emotional effect on the listener. There are no real rules to songwriting and all rules can be broken. If it can be quantized or put it into some kind of order or logic it is no longer art. The creativity of taking something from an emotional abstract and putting it together in a very unique way is art. In the traditional music education system there are all kinds of music theory rules of what is right and what is wrong. I’m not against it because you have to learn it to build a foundation to work from. You have to free your mind and use your heart and ears. Who gives a damn about right and wrong as long as it sounds good. There is a Creative Songwriting Video Course that I do recommend.

  1. Write out the lyrics on paper or find them on the Internet.
  2. Determine what key it’s in and what scales are being played.
  3. Find all the chords and chord changes of the song
  4. Group the part to the song formats
  5. Match the lyrics to the chord changes
  6. Play along with the song recording until you get the parts smoothly
  7. Play the song by yourself without the aid of playing along
  8. Play and sing the song with an acoustic working on each isolated part until you get them down.
  9. Pull all the parts together and work on playing the whole song.
  10. Record yourself and evaluate how you can play it better.
  11. If you like playing lead learn the solo parts the same way.
  12. Rehearse the song with a band and work on playing live.

Song Forms Variations

1. AABA
2. ABAB
3. ABAC

Song Format

1. Verse
2. Chorus (Hook)
3. Pre-Chorus (Pre-Hook)
4. Bridge

Verse – Rhythm, Harmony and Melody have repetition, Lyrics have some variation to tell the song theme story line and weave into the subtle repetitive melodic variations. The intensity level is lowered to keep the lyrics on top.

Chorus – Rhythm, Harmony and Melody have repetition but are different from the Verse. Lyrics are usually the same and highlight the song title theme with a melodic repetition to hook the listener. Intensity level is highest and is always higher than the Verse.

Pre Chorus – Rhythm, Harmony and Melody have repetition, Different from the verse, slightly different from the chorus with a shortened offset variation to lead into it. The intensity level builds up from the verse to the chorus.

Bridge – Different musically from all the other parts and pull the listener in another direction, usually has no vocals and has room to fit a solo part. (solos can sometimes fit over a verse part when there’s no bridge)

Below is some examples of some song format and form variations 1# 2# #3 #4 #5.

A1 Verse, A2 Verse, A3 Verse, A1 Verse, B Chorus
C Chorus, A1 Verse, B Pre-Chorus, A2 Verse, A3 Verse
A1 Verse, A2 Verse, C1 Chorus, C2 Chorus, C1 Chorus
B1 Chorus, B2 Chorus, A1 Verse, A2 Verse, A3 Verse
A1 Verse, C Bridge, B Pre-Chorus, B1 Chorus, B2 Chorus

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The 3 Note / String 6 Note Shape is a great way to learn the Major Scale. This is a technique of breaking something down to smaller chunks to make it easier to learn. The examples below are analyzing the G Major Scale on the two lowest strings E (6th) & A (5th). A lot of people have to find a way visualize something before they can put it into their total recall memory. To also help people remember something is they have to physically apply and do something. The numbers in the notes are the finger placement (Refer to Fret Finger Placement Post) so you can try it.. This scale is made up of half steps (no frets between 2 notes) and whole steps (1 fret between 2 notes).

We now have seven – six note groups, notice that two shapes are the same (Fret 3 & Fret 10- whole step-whole step, whole step-whole step). The five unique shapes is (Fret 5 – whole step-half step, whole step-whole step). (Fret 7- half step-whole step, whole step-half step), (Fret 8 – whole step-whole step, half step-whole step). (Fret 12 – whole step-half step, whole step-half step), (Fret 14 – half step-whole step, half step-whole step).

When you try playing these shapes (Fret 3) you are going to play them on two strings only up the neck in a straight sequence (1-2-3-4-5-6) Tablature – ( 6th E -3–5–7-) (5th A – 3 –5–7-). The top 5% best players practice scales this way up and down the neck on all the pairs of strings.(Paul Gilbert, Gregg Howe, Vinnie Moore).

One warning the shapes are going to be different between the (3rd G string & 2nd B string). The notes on the 2nd B String have to shift up a half step making the shapes offset.

When you start getting the hang of practicing scales like this you can also apply sequences to these six note groups. Sequences are a repetitive order of a group of notes. Here is an example (instead of 1-2-3-4-5-6 try 1-2-3-4-3-2-1-2-3-4-5-6) this is a sequence that Paul Gilbert teaches a lot. Practicing scales like this can build great dexterity in your fingers, building your chops and speed. It especially helps if you use a metronome set to straight clicks, triplets and quadruplet, building from slow to fast.

Here is a final note, playing scales up and down and practicing sequences is only one part of the practice equation to becoming a great player. There is speed and chops, but there also is melodic control. Melodic phrasing is a small group of notes played in an unique expressive order crafted from the rhythm and harmony that can hook the listener.. The best solos have a hook melody interwoven in them (usually at he start and end and somewhere in the middles in different octaves) along with the fast ripping runs of notes. Learning licks from all kinds of sources (Books, Software, Magazines, Tablature web sites and By Ear off CD’s and MP 3’s). This article builds on my Major Scale 3 Note / String Fingerings Post.

Guitar Analyzer Software has a 3 shape fingering selection category to explore this area in more depth for each scale.

1) Fret 3 & Fret 10 (whole step-whole step, whole step-whole step)

2) Fret 5 (whole step-half step, whole step-whole step)

3) Fret 7 (half step-whole step, whole step-half step)

4) Fret 8 (whole step-whole step, half step-whole step)

5) Fret 12 (whole step-half step, whole step-half step)

6) Fret 14 (half step-whole step, half step-whole step)


G Major 3 Note / String on String 5 & 6

 

 

                                            3 ( N/S) Shape Fret 3 Phrygian 3 Note/String Shape G Major 3 Note/String Fret 10 G Major 3 Note/String Fret 14

                                                              Dorian 3 Note/String Shape G Major 3 Note/String Fret 8 G Major 3 Note/String Fret !2

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To prepare you for this article refer to the post categories of Theory and Technique that contain the articles named Fret Finger Placement, Interval Theory, Understanding Major Scale Modes.

This article is about the Minor Pentatonic Scale and how the scale relates to chord harmony. The Penta name stands for 5 notes and this scale was originated from early music cultures in China, Polynesia and Africa. This scale is used in a lot of modern music (Blues, R&B, Rock & Jazz) and it is one of the easiest scales to solo in. The intervals in the scale come from a lot of popular common chords that are used in modern music. It is a wide interval scale made up of (1 whole steps – 3 frets wide) and (1 1/2 steps – 4 fret wide).

I put together a guitar pentatonic scale chart for chord harmony to the five modes of the Minor Pentatonic Scale. This guitar pentatonic scale chart shows the scale to chord interval formulas that match by column for each scale mode degree. The row for the scale mode degree are in Roman Numerals. In music the lower case represents minor and upper case is major. The notes row is each note of the scale. The Minor Pentatonic row is the name of each mode with their interval formula in brackets. Below that on the far left column are all rows for the related chord types. Each column with a chord name and a formula in brackets has a relationship match to the scale formula for that column. This guitar pentatonic scale chart is great way to find chord progression orders for song ideas in the A Minor Pentatonic Scale.

Below the chart there are scale fingerings, the top ones show the interval formulas for each scale mode with the tonal center (1) having a square. The matching shape fingerings below each shows the fret finger placement numbers in the Finger Per Fret Rule. The chromatic notes not played in the seven note major scale is an outline of the pentatonic scale. This is just like the black keys not played on the piano in the key of C Major (The white keys).

A lot of great guitar players stay in the pentatonic scale in the majority of their guitar solos. They hold out the major scale half step notes only to chord voices that match them. These notes are either played or sometimes bending into the note. A lot of blues and rock riff base song ideas use a pattern of notes used as a rhythm from the pentatonic scale. The pentatonic scale sounds very bland until you use vibrato and bending to give the notes an expressive quality. Rock style pentatonic riffs have a lot of rapid hammer on and pull off sequenced patterns that are played very fast. In the Blues Style the notes are more slowly phrased and articulated. There are some great guitar players that can fit in dynamically phrased fast runs into their blues solos like the late great Stevie Ray Vaughan.

Pentatonic Scale Harmony Chart

 

A Minor Pentatonic Harmony Chart

A Minor Pentatonic Scale Harmony Chart

 

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